humongous life
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Writing

Monster

"Victor Frankenstein forges his own agonizing destiny, a life of suffering for his 'monster,' and the destruction of his loved ones all in one cataclysmic act of self-importance and superficiality. Though Victor’s self-importance drove him to spend many long and painstaking months engineering his monster, it only took one instant for his superficial abandonment of the physically appalling beast to seal both of their destinies. While warning against only looking skin-deep, Shelley also imparts that forces of nature – like the spirit of life – are volatile and unpredictable..."

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Aly Stosz
Black Star

"...Such an idea reassured whites, insecure of their obvious social dominance, that they were rightfully in power and that there was no threat of losing authority. In the '30s, rigid, one-dimensional typecasts were just beginning to develop complexity thanks to the actors who performed them. Bill Robinson “was congenial, confident, and very very cool. Unlike Stepin Fetchit, he was articulate and reliable,” says Bogle. Because of his positive character attributes, there were far less complaints against Bill Robinson from civil rights groups than there were against actors like Stepin Fetchit."

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Aly Stosz
Interview with Sisters

"...Think of all the instagram accounts where people flaunt their unique quality and attract a lot of attention for it - whether its vitiligo or a double mastectomy. Advertising it represents the glorious spectrum of humanity, and fights the idea of a hierarchy of value based on physical standards. Its a blessing to be rewarded for the very thing that has caused you suffering. I do this, I put myself out there as the "Humongous Girl." Its wonderful that we get to celebrate what we've been told is a flaw. On the other hand, there is a part of me that feels sickened by everyone branding themselves and boxing up their massively complex human potential into an easy to digest TV version of self. I love to do the opposite - to encourage people to expand ourselves and the world around them rather than narrow ourselves into brands. But I still use the form, I still take photos next to short people and giant statues or holding little tiny treasures. And I'm not mad about it. Its fun and easy to digest and invites people to look a little deeper, and there is always depth to discover past the superficial..."

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Aly Stosz
Basement Studio

"...The dressing room was a secret place, a stark reality behind the curtain of fantasy. The private world of the women, unknown to our clients who were quarantined exclusively to the play rooms in the dungeon, as fancy as film sets. In our brilliant shimmering New York neighborhood we were separated only by drywall, concrete, and a little bit of dirt from doctors offices, fitness clubs, bodegas, and train stations. I’ll take you there. All you need is a few bucks for the train, the city arteries that pump through filthy tunnels, steel tubes that carry human flesh and the random crap that belongs to us. Exit out of the hole in the sidewalk in Chelsea..."

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Aly Stosz
Digital-Organic

"...Outside I saw my ally who was on stage entertaining a large group of people, she winked at me very expressively and sent me a big shiny rose emoji, kissing it first. When it arrived it was a real glowing rose, I kissed it heartfully and tucked it behind my ear. My male ally turned to me and began to tell me things I didn’t know were going on with my mother. The authority had wanted to put her on a whole shopping list of other dangerous sounding drugs to help her better “adapt” to the matrix..."

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Aly Stosz
Route 5

"...You look right, and glimpse a row of beautiful and strange bodies - black, naked silhouettes of trees rising straight out of river pools. The sun appears for the first time all day and reflects stinging white off the water, which is so high it’s almost parallel with the road.

This exact spot is known as the Oxbow Marina, on the cusp of three towns. The painter Thomas Cole sat on Mount Tom - (you look up and see its peak) - in 1836 and painted “The Oxbow,” which now resides in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

On the naked rocky bank of the river, tourists gather to walk amongst ancient dinosaur tracks frozen in stone. Dinosaurs ruled this planet before us (230 million years ago), and for much longer than us (160 million years)..."

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Aly Stosz